docs: Android Design typo and grammar fixes

Change-Id: Ice0eb216c985183e2f41c287ea5d1cc7af1f31f2
diff --git a/docs/html/design/get-started/ui-overview.html b/docs/html/design/get-started/ui-overview.html
index b08c743..bd5ff9c 100644
--- a/docs/html/design/get-started/ui-overview.html
+++ b/docs/html/design/get-started/ui-overview.html
@@ -153,12 +153,12 @@
   </div>
 </div>
 
-<h2>UI Bars</h2>
+<h2>System Bars</h2>
 
-<p>The UI bars are screen areas dedicated to the display of notifications, communication of device
-status, and device navigation. Typically the UI bars are displayed concurrently with your app. Apps
-that display immersive content, such as movies or images, can temporarily hide the UI bars to allow
-the user to enjoy full screen content without distraction.</p>
+<p>The system bars are screen areas dedicated to the display of notifications, communication of device
+status, and device navigation. Typically the system bars are displayed concurrently with your app.
+Apps that display immersive content, such as movies or images, can temporarily hide the system bars
+to allow the user to enjoy full screen content without distraction.</p>
 
 <img src="../static/content/ui_overview_system_ui.png">
 
@@ -177,8 +177,9 @@
   Recents, and also displays a menu for apps written for Android 2.3 or earlier.</p>
 </li>
 <li>
-<h4>System Bar</h4>
-<p>Combines the status and navigation bars for display on tablet form factors.</p>
+<h4>Combined Bar</h4>
+<p>On tablet form factors the status and navigation bars are combined into a single bar at the
+  bottom of the screen.</p>
 </li>
 </ol>
 
diff --git a/docs/html/design/patterns/app-structure.html b/docs/html/design/patterns/app-structure.html
index b87f402..fb9205b 100644
--- a/docs/html/design/patterns/app-structure.html
+++ b/docs/html/design/patterns/app-structure.html
@@ -159,9 +159,9 @@
 
     <img src="../static/content/app_structure_market.png">
     <div class="figure-caption">
-      Market's start screen primarily allows navigation into the stores for Apps, Music, Books, and
-      Games. It is also enriched with tailored recommendations and promotions that surface content
-      of interest to the user. Search is readily available from the action bar.
+      Market's start screen primarily allows navigation into the stores for Apps, Music, Books,
+      Movies and Games. It is also enriched with tailored recommendations and promotions that
+      surface content of interest to the user. Search is readily available from the action bar.
     </div>
 
   </div>
diff --git a/docs/html/design/patterns/navigation.html b/docs/html/design/patterns/navigation.html
index aabfc39..cad3682 100644
--- a/docs/html/design/patterns/navigation.html
+++ b/docs/html/design/patterns/navigation.html
@@ -131,7 +131,7 @@
 <p>The Back key also supports a few behaviors not directly tied to screen-to-screen navigation:</p>
 <ul>
 <li>Back dismisses floating windows (dialogs, popups)</li>
-<li>Back dismisses contextual action bars, and remove highlight from selected items</li>
+<li>Back dismisses contextual action bars, and removes the highlight from the selected items</li>
 <li>Back hides the onscreen keyboard (IME)</li>
 </ul>
 <h2>Navigation Within Your App</h2>
@@ -189,18 +189,19 @@
 <h4>App-to-app navigation</h4>
 <p>When navigating deep into your app's hierarchy directly from another app via an intent, Back will
 return to the referring app.</p>
-<p>The Up button is handled is follows:
+<p>The Up button is handled as follows:
 - If the destination screen is typically reached from one particular screen within your app, Up
   should navigate to that screen.
 - Otherwise, Up should navigate to the topmost ("Home") screen of your app.</p>
-<p>For example, after choosing to share a book being view in Market, the user navigates directly to the
-Gmail's compose screen. From there, Up returns to the Inbox (which happens to be both the typical
-referrer to compose, as well as the topmost screen of the app), while Back returns to Market.</p>
+<p>For example, after choosing to share a book being viewed in Market, the user navigates directly to
+Gmail's compose screen. From there, Up returns to the Inbox (which happens to be both the
+typical referrer to compose, as well as the topmost screen of the app), while Back returns to
+Market.</p>
 
 <img src="../static/content/navigation_from_outside_up.png">
 
 <h4>System-to-app navigation</h4>
-<p>If the your app was reached via the system mechanisms of notifications or home screen widgets, Up
+<p>If your app was reached via the system mechanisms of notifications or home screen widgets, Up
 behaves as described for app-to-app navigation, above.</p>
 <p>For the Back key, you should make navigation more predictably by inserting into the task's back
 stack the complete upward navigation path to the app's topmost screen. This way, a user who has
diff --git a/docs/html/design/patterns/notifications.html b/docs/html/design/patterns/notifications.html
index acec306..c5045ae 100644
--- a/docs/html/design/patterns/notifications.html
+++ b/docs/html/design/patterns/notifications.html
@@ -200,7 +200,7 @@
 the user is taken to a hierarchy level below your app's top-level, insert navigation into your app's
 back stack to allow them to navigate to your app's top level using the system back key. For more
 information, see the chapter on <em>System-to-app navigation</em> in the
-<a href="../patterns/notifications.html">Navigation</a> design pattern.</p>
+<a href="../patterns/navigation.html">Navigation</a> design pattern.</p>
 <h4>Timestamps for time sensitive events</h4>
 <p>By default, standard Android notifications include a timestamp in the upper right corner. Consider
 whether the timestamp is valuable in the context of your notification. If the timestamp is not